But is it Poetry? (2)

This is by way of a reblog from John Spiers, whose posts don't have a 'Reblog' button. Click this link for the post from his blog mylifewithgracie.com which gives links to two websites: one to assess your poems and another to assess your song lyrics. As those who follow my poetic efforts will be aware, … Continue reading But is it Poetry? (2)

Timeless Truths

Things we find funny change as we get older. Small children laugh at clowns. Richard Hearne OBE 1908-1979: As a tweenager, I recall reading a library book my mother had just finished ― one of Leslie Charteris’s “Saint” stories. I was moved to hysteria over a comment made by Simon Templar to his sidekick, Hoppy. … Continue reading Timeless Truths

Tiny stories

Photo by Pedro Figueras on Pexels.com I've mentioned before on this blog the website 101 words that publishes stories of exactly 101-words. That post was to highlight how useful the ideal title can be when words are limited. This post is in awe at the ability to fit an actual story, – with beginning, middle … Continue reading Tiny stories

New Fiction from a Whittlesey Wordsmith

Killing Time in Cambridge Just published is a tale of a Cambridge detective with an unusual sidekick , written by an author who knows his territory. Affection for Cambridge and its surroundings shines through the story and its gentle humour ensures these murders won't keep you awake at night. A Good holiday read. Find Phil … Continue reading New Fiction from a Whittlesey Wordsmith

Feathered Friendship

Since last year, I've been following a blogger who talks with his chickens. I've no problem with that – I have discussions with the family's dogs (mainly about whether it's feeding time yet – they're a pragmatic bunch) but back when we were between dogs I've been known to talk to fish in the fish tank … Continue reading Feathered Friendship

The Railway Carriage Child now in print

Wendy Fletcher is a founder member of our writing group, the Whittlesey Wordsmiths. Her work in progress for many years has, at last, come to fruition and the first copy arrived today. This reblogged post is from the group’s WordPress blog.

Whittlesey Wordsmiths

Wendy's Book Wendy Fletcher with her first print copy of The Railway Carriage Child

About two years ago I joined the local U3A Writing group as its third member. At my first meeting in Whittlesey’s Not Just Cafe, I was able to read a chapter from Wendy Fletcher’s autobiography. It was unfinished and hadn’t a title but it was for me a work of exceptional quality. Today the first-ever print copy was delivered to Wendy she brought it to the Writing Group (Whittlesey Wordsmiths) meeting opened the envelope and together with Wendy, we had the first sight of it.

This is the foreword

Against a backdrop of the Cambridgeshire fens, lies the

small market town of Whittlesey. Here are many features

of historical and architectural interest, including two

medieval churches, a 17th century Butter Cross and rare

examples of 18th century mud boundary walls.

Less well known, but still quite remarkable, are…

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Where the Wild Winds Blow by the Whittlesey Wordsmiths

I’d like to thank Eva Jordan for her review of our writing group’s anthology Where The Wild Winds Blow.
Eva’s most recent title, Time Will Tell, is her third and concluding story about the Lemalf family, following 183 Times a Year and All the Colours In Between.

Eva Jordan

Book Review – Where the Wild Winds Blow by the Whittlesey Wordsmiths

Independently Published 

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Recently, a member of a local writing group approached me and asked me if I’d be interested in reviewing a book they had put together and published. Honoured, I said I’d love to.

Where the Wild Winds Blow is an eclectic mix of fact and fiction, featuring short stories, poems and memoirs contributed by the various members of the Whittlesey Wordsmiths. I have to say; I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I will admit I was pleasantly surprised. Informative, thought provoking, and at times, enjoyably humorous, it was a real pleasure to read.

At just over 400 pages long it is quite a dense book, but for me it is not a book that should be devoured all at once, but rather savoured, slowly. Neither does it need to be read sequentially, but rather…

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