Laughter Lines

I was into my sixties when I began writing. Most successful writers took half a lifetime to hone their craft. Us silver scribblers have less time to smooth out those wrinkles in our writing that identify an apprentice wordsmith. This blog is about my own writing wrinkles. (You may prefer to call them laughter-lines but … Continue reading Laughter Lines

Wordcounting, and other edits

I like editing. Back in the days when most of my writing output was instruction leaflets for library resources, I enjoyed re-organising paragraphs and sections to hold back information until the student needed it, rather than pre-loading with explanations they didn't need yet and wouldn’t understand. Now I've broadened my writing scope, I still enjoy … Continue reading Wordcounting, and other edits

The New WordPress Editor:

Introduction & Basic Functions (with Screenshots & Step-By-Step Instructions)

Maybe I move in the wrong circles, but all the posts I’ve seen so far about the new editor have detailed how to turn it off, so I found this advice on retrospectivlily.com encouraging as well as enlightening.

Retrospective Lily

Hi, friends. Happy New Year! 🙂 Speaking of things that are new…

A new editor has come to WordPress, and while using it isn’t mandatory for now, we’ll all (presumably) be forced to switch at some point. [It’s actually a few months old but new to me.]

Anticipating that, I have been using the new editor for a couple weeks. At first, I hated it, because who likes change? Now that I’m used to it, I like it more than the old one (mostly).

Without further ado, let’s dive in.

The Foundational Difference Between the Old & New Editor

The old editor works like the average text document, such as Microsoft Word or Google Docs. A blog post is essentially one text document filled with various components. All the options for formatting are arranged across the top. If you want to write a list, insert a blockquote, make a…

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Christmas Presence

This blog post contains no advice, offers or ‘value’ (a key concept in the blog guru’s toolkit ) ...merely a wish that your Christmas is all that you hope it to be. Feel free to stop reading there if you’re busy (and, aren’t we all?). I’d intended to post a couple of paragraphs but, like … Continue reading Christmas Presence

Christmas Starts Here

’Twas the night before Christmas when Santa’s new elf, in the vast, silent workshop, sat all by herself. She’d been fetching and carrying, sent to and fro making tea, running errands – the least of the low.   And she’d mucked out the stables, not noticing that daft old Rudolph was munching her new elven … Continue reading Christmas Starts Here

Switching on the imagination

I sometimes feel that, as a fledgling writer, my advice on here is rather like the blind leading the blind (excuse cliche ). With that in mind, I share these thoughts from our writing group’s blog.

Whittlesey Wordsmiths

Sunrise in the fens with windturbines A spectacular Fenland Sunrise One of the most beautiful sunrises I have witnessed

Reading is a means of switching on the imagination. The pictures drawn in the mind, the voices heard and the drama that unfolds can be as real to a reader as anything encountered in life. In many ways it is a better reality, one that is acceptable on the reader’s terms, limited by what they want to take out of it or see within it.

As writers we grope around for the switch that lights the imagination of our readers. The words though must first paint pictures in our own minds, we are after all the first reader. Hopefully these pictures will be seen in  the mind’s eye of our readers. We know they  will see different pictures to ours, pictures on their terms. The voices too they hear will have different accents to the ones in…

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Leaving Us

‘What’s this on the carpet? Digger’s thrown up. Go on girl – in the garden.’ ‘What’s she been eating?’ my husband asks from the sofa. As if I’d know. ‘This is clear bile, but there’s a patch of something brown as well.’ I go to get water and paper roll from the kitchen, where I find … Continue reading Leaving Us

Danny Boy

As previously reported, I entered the recent 24-hour short story contest run by Angela Hoy's Writer's Weekly. com  (https://24hourshortstorycontest.com/ ) – just to see if I could. Thinking up stories on the hop isn't my strong point. As promised in my earlier post, the story is reproduced below. On the date of the contest, (around 6pm … Continue reading Danny Boy

Fred’s Legacy

We bought a pre-loved camper-van. We’d travelled up by train. The owner’s dog had crept inside and wouldn’t come out again. The lady planned to emigrate. She’d shown us both around, watched carefully by Algernon, an indeterminate hound. . Embarrassed, she said, ‘Take him too.  ‘He won’t cost much to feed. ‘He can’t come when … Continue reading Fred’s Legacy

Tell It Like It Is

Dialogue can be tricky. If you want to make your characters’ conversations sparkle, there is plenty of good advice on the internet. But first, tidy up basics, like punctuation and speech tags, that can distract from your brilliant banter. This is a checklist to help you dust off your dialogue ready for that final polish that … Continue reading Tell It Like It Is

Goblins and Trolls

When goblins denigrate your work, and trolls belittle every line, Don’t even try to understand the labyrinth of their twisted minds.   Trolls delight in others’ pain – seek to destroy, not to create, And leave behind them worms of doubt that stir your fears and feed on hate.   Picture Henson’s Labyrinth creatures – … Continue reading Goblins and Trolls